11 places to visit in Dublin

With it being St Paddy’s Day on Friday and the England vs Ireland game in the Six Nations it only seemed right to write a post on 11 places you should visit in Dublin this week seeing as I have been twice. So I am told by an Irish friend, the Irish love to actually dye Guinness green on St Paddy’s Day but to be warned that it is a lot more expensive! Unfortunately though neither of those times have been on St Paddy’s Day but one day I will go.

These aren’t in any particular order of top places but just a selection of places I visited and thought of off the top of my head.Sadly, I don’t have photos for all of these so apologies that some places do not contain my images.

#1 Guinness Storehouse
Would it really be a trip to Dublin without visiting the Guinness Storehouse? Here, you get to pour your very own pint and learn the history of one of Ireland’s most loved drinks. Here’s a photo of me pouring my own pint of Guinness – look at the concentration on that face!

#2 Jameson’s Whisky Distillery
Again, would it really be a trip to Ireland without visiting the Jameson’s Factory? The Jameson’s Distillery is quite similar to the Guinness Factory in the sense of they take you on a tour of how the whisky is made and the history of it. Sadly, you don’t get to pour yourself a glass but you are offered whisky tasters and get to have glass of whisky at the end. You also have the opportunity to try a proper Irish whisky – I can confirm that they are incredibly delicious!

#3 Dublinia Experience Viking & Medieval Dublin
Dublinia isn’t really a museum but more of a living history centre, it portrays living history from Dublin’s Viking era to it’s Medieval era, and to modern day excavations of Dublin. Each of these sections are split over three floors. It also has lots of interactive information and many replicas of Viking and Medieval life based on the archaeology found in the city. The excavation replicas are layed out to portray what was found and to enlighten visitors on what an actual excavation is like. Essentially it’s portraying a “day in the life of an archaeologist”.

#4 National Museum of Ireland
The National Museum of Ireland has four separate museum locations, all filled with different artefacts. These cover Archaeology, Country Life, Natural History & Decorative Arts & History. The Archaeology building is quite similar to the British Museum in the sense it contains not only Irish artefacts but also artefacts from around the World. Unfortunately I can’t advise on what the Country Life museum is like due not actually visiting it, so sorry on that part! While the Arts & History museum contains decorative artefacts from Ireland’s past as well as it’s political and social history. The Natural History, on the other hand, is presumably the eldest museum out of the four with the way it’s laid out. If taxidermies are your kind of thing then you will love this!

#5 Dublin Castle
Built in the 1300s on a Viking settlement, Dublin Castle served as the Head Quarters of the English when Ireland was still part of Britain. It was given back to the Irish in 1922 after they were given their independence. It is still used as an important building for Irish Government and can be visited by the public on a daily basis. The interior is quite magnificent and in the style of an old English stately home.

#6 Oscar Wilde statue
Located in one of the corners of Merrion Square Park, the statue is a memorial to Irish author and playright Oscar Wilde. If you love literature there are plenty of places to go dedicated to many of Ireland’s poets, playrights and authors.

#7 Trinity College
Although Trinity College is Dublin’s University, you are able to walk through it’s campus to view the architecture of it. You can also visit the Trinity College that contains the Book of Kells which is a Medieval manuscript and one of Ireland’s most important treasures.

Source

#8 The General Post Office
Although the Post Office is still fully functioning as a post office, the building played a significant part in the 1916 Easter Uprising in the fight for Irish independence. The building was used as the headquarters by the men and women who took part in the rebellion. If you stand outside the building, you can see bullet holes in the walls as a result of the rebellion.

#9 Christ Church Cathedral
A cathedral of holy trinity that was originally founded by the Vikings but the building we know today is of Medieval origin. You can go inside and visit, although you do have to pay you can but joint tickets along with your Dublinia experience.

Source

#10 The Spire of Light statue
The Spire was erected in 2002, stands at over 120 metres high and is located on O’Connell Street. It is alternatively referred to as the “Monument of Light” due to its large reflective, stainless steel surface. The location of the Spire was originally the location of the Nelson’s Pillar statue which was erected in 1805 after the Battle of Trafalgar, and when Ireland was still occupied by the British. It was so badly damaged by IRA explosives in 1966 that the Irish Army knocked the rest of it down as a result.

Source

#11 National Library Ireland
The National Library of Ireland holds all key documents for looking at genealogy but it is free to visit even if you aren’t requesting to look at archives. It is another one of Dublin’s buildings that has beautiful architecture so if you love looking at buildings, I’d recommend visiting.

 

Have you been to Dublin or anywhere else in Ireland?

Connect:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *